Study published: Adaptation of intervention for people with dementia and depression

2024-03-20

In a paper recently published in BMC Geriatrics, the authors present results from phase I of the INVOLVERA project, where authors have developed a low-intensity behavioral activation intervention for people with dementia and depression. In this study, the intervention was adapted based on the needs and preferences of people with dementia, informal caregivers, healthcare professionals, and patient organisations.

An elderly woman and a young man walking in a park
In the study, an intervention for people with dementia and depression was adapted, based on the needs and preferences of different groups. Photo: Mikael Wallerstedt

The INVOLVERA intervention

The INVOLVERA intervention is delivered via workbooks. An informal caregiver provides support to the person living with dementia to work through the workbooks. At the same time the informal caregiver receives guidance from a trained healthcare professional. The intervention was originally developed in the United Kingdom, and in the INVOLVERA project it has been adapted to the Swedish healthcare and cultural context to ensure the cultural appropriateness, relevancy and acceptability.

Adaptation of the support program to Swedish context and culture

This study specifically aimed to adapt the intervention for the Swedish context by exploring the needs and preferences of people living with dementia, informal caregivers, healthcare professionals, and community stakeholders concerning intervention content and the proposed intervention delivery model. Some examples of adaptations carried out based on needs and preferences was: (1) A professional design company redesigned the workbooks and gave them a more modern look, and designed new illustrations; (2) People depicted in illustrations and case stories were more diversified in age, gender, and ethic background; (3) Examples of activities in illustrations and case stories was adapted to better reflect Swedish society; (4) Additional guidance sessions were added for the informal caregiver who provides support; and (5) The amount of text in the workbooks was reduced to decrease the burden of the material on the person living with dementia and the caregiver.

Adaptation can increase acceptability of the intervention

Results will help us to further adapt the intervention to enhance the cultural appropriateness, relevancy and acceptability for people living with dementia and depression and their informal caregivers in Sweden. PhD Student Oscar Blomberg is first author of the paper, and assistant senior lecturer Joanne Woodford is the principal investigator for the INVOLVERA project.

Read the article ‘Adaptation of a guided low-intensity behavioral activation intervention for people with dementia in Sweden: a qualitative study exploring the needs and preferences of key stakeholders’. It is written by Oscar Blomberg, Frida Svedin, Paul Farrand, Anders Brantnell, Louise von Essen, Johanna Patriksson Karlsson, Anna Cristina Åberg, and Joanne Woodford.

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Last modified: 2023-03-24